“We’re supposed to get a Norwegian!”

(Title courtesy of the realest of Real Housewives of New Jersey, Teresa Giudice who made that pronouncement when forecasting the upcoming winter weather patterns in the northeast.)

Maybe I’ve had Norway on my mind lately, or maybe it’s because I’ve been studying egg cups  on the internet and the most intriguing are the ones from Norway but I really think I need a few pieces of Figgjo Flint.

Style obsession-wise, I’ve been slowly moving away from the 40s and 50s and inching my way right up to the late 60s and early 70s so naturally that means a whole new world of dishes to discover. Here’s the thing, though – I don’t know if it was the times or the place but I can’t figure out what some of these things are for.

(L) Mystery bowl (C, top) Egg cups! (C, bottom) Wha? (R) Tiny little porcelain skillet

  • On the left is 4″ wide bowl with a mystery opening. There are all manner of regular bowls available from this manufacturer but this one shows up every now and then. Is it a handle? An opening to pour through? Merely a decorative element? I don’t know.
  • Egg cups! Because you know that’s happening, sooner more likely than later.
  • The small pitcher with the tray is the real mystery to me. There are big pitchers, small pitchers, creamers, creamer and sugar sets and then this. What could it be for? Is that well a place to put sugar cubes? Is it for berries that you then drench in cream? What other small food needs a sauce immediately near by?
  • The small skillet is 5″ across and is unglazed on the bottom, marked for oven and stovetop use. What were they making in this? Maybe it’s a gratin but it’s only 1″ deep.

FYI – I love this kind of stuff. Single purpose crap that you don’t need taking up room that you can’t spare! Why serve something in an everyday cereal bowl when you can use a bowl with a decorative hole in it? Who has enough cabinet room to store egg cups with their own space-hogging plates built in? Who wouldn’t want to set out the mystery combo on the table and then sit perched awaiting inquiry from some unsophisticated dinner guest? “Oh that! Haven’t you ever seen one before?” BOOM. Automatic winner of the pretentious hostess wars.

And wouldn’t that tiny little skillet be just the thing to transport boiled eggs from the egg cooker to the table?

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14 thoughts on ““We’re supposed to get a Norwegian!”

  1. Had I not been thinking about Norway, I would have said that the hole in the bowl, L, was for chopsticks. You know, so you didn’t have to hold them the entire time.

  2. I don’t know thing one about “Figgjo Flint”, but I am hooked already. Why do you do this?

    I confess, I was previously in love with all things Scandahoovian. My first boss was an elderly Swede who invited me to dine one evening with him and his lovely wife. It was the first time I’d ever seen a blue carpeted home decorated with all manner of delicate white dishes with that lovely blue design. My mother was German, so it was all brown, all the time.

  3. Maybe the hole in the bowl is for your thumb to facilitate slurping your cereal milk (yuck) or soup. Perhaps you put sugar cubes in the plate space next to the cream. And maybe the little skillet is a little hot plate, or individual bread warmer, or a decorative wall ornament.

  4. Perhaps the combo thingy is for the cream and small cookies/candies. Other than that, I have no idea but they are very attractive.

  5. Whatever else happens we’d, by heck, better get a Norwegian! I’ve been promised one and I want it! If it comes with a hole or a little shelf/lip/dip so much the better! You are endlessly entertaining. Thanks.

  6. The bowls with the holes in them are to hang on the wall and put salt in (at least that’s what my grandmother did!). The creamer and tray are for berries and cream. And we put the skillet thingie in the oven to warm it up and then put rolls in it for the table. Voila! Thank for you for such an entertaining blog!

  7. Pingback: Dishes And Fishes: In Which I Am A Dish Dectective | Cripes Suzette

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